This week has seen a plethora of food holidays that tempt the taste buds.  For those of you who missed it, National Cheese Day was June 4th.  And who doesn’t like cheese except for fascists???  And Adolf Hitler. Evidently, he was lactose intolerant.  And this was at a time where they didn’t have pills or special types additives to dairy products to aid in digestion.  Can you imagine having stabbing pains when you eat cheese and not be able to do anything about it?  No wonder there was a whole World War.  If he wasn’t going to be able to eat cheese then no one could.  Stupid Hitler.  Those on the side of cheese will always prevail.

Second, there was National Donut Day on June 2nd.  Who doesn’t love a good donut?  From simple glazed to cream filled, to candy coated, to twists and crullers, the donut comes in all sizes and shapes.  And I could celebrate all of those donuts and did on the day.  I went out with my daughter to one of the most amazing Donut shops in all of Orange County.  (I’m still looking forward to going back and trying one of their savory selections.)But no celebration is complete without understanding the history of one of the most beloved desserts on the planet.  And we here at the Guide promise to bring you all the harrowing details of the doughnut (donut), and all of the controversy.  So we scoured the fake news for all of the juicy details on the doughnut, and bring them directly here to you.

And while those holidays were great, today we celebrate a different holiday in the food world.  It is essentially a spinoff holiday.  This is a holiday that takes one particular food holiday ingredient and “kicks it up a notch.”  This spinoff holiday covers the donut.

While we all know about the amazing donuts that are out there, and Donut places (if you haven’t been to The Donut Man in Glendora you are really missing out on something), there are particular donuts we love more than any other donut.  And what would this type of donut be?  The Jelly Donut of course.  Fruity sticky goodness stuffed in sweet fried bread.  What could be better?But no celebration is complete without understanding the history of one of the most beloved desserts on the planet.  And we here at the Guide promise to bring you all the harrowing details of the doughnut (donut), and all of the controversy.  So we scoured the fake news for all of the juicy details on the doughnut, and bring them directly here to you.

But no celebration is complete without understanding the history of one of the most beloved desserts on the planet.  And we here at the Guide promise to bring you all the harrowing details of the doughnut (donut), and all of the controversy.  So we scoured the fake news for all of the juicy details on the doughnut, and bring them directly here to you.

June 8th is National Jelly-Filled Donut Day in the U.S. and we here are going to be partying like it’s 1999.  But no celebration is complete without understanding the history of one of the most beloved desserts on the planet.  And we here at the Guide promise to bring you all the harrowing details of the doughnut (donut), and all of the controversy.  So we scoured the fake news for all of the juicy details on the doughnut, and bring them directly here to you, unedited and unfiltered.  (And sometimes uncensored.). So without further ado, we bring you the History of the Doughnut, as told by the Single Dad’s Guide to Life.


The History Of The Doughnut

When we here at the Guide began our research on the history of the Doughnut, little did we know what a drama queen it was.   For what other food would have 4 different claims to who actually invented the silly thing?  First, there were the Dutch.  The biggest rumor consists of them coming to the states and having a bad batch of citrus with them on the journey.  This citrus so inflamed their taste buds that they needed to clean off the flavor.  So they took the bread that they had made and decided to fry it up because everything tastes better fried.  Just look at county fairs.  Some people dipped these fried bread pieces in chocolate.  And some decided to slice them open and serve them up as toasty, with ample jelly in the middle.

The second of the rumors is brought to us by Hanson Gregory in 1847.  He believed that at the tender age of 16 he was the first person to decide that twists and odd shapes in with the fried dough was not enough.  He had seen what other people were doing with fried dough and said to himself, “Those things look ugly. What is more perfect than a circle?  And while I am at it, why not stick a hole in the center of that circle?”  OK!  Maybe he didn’t say that exactly.  But he did say bleh when he tried other fried bread.  And was dissatisfied with the fact that he felt that the soft undercooked goo at the center of the bread was gross.  So he punched a whole in it.  Thus, circle “dough” nuts and doughnut holes were born.

An anthropologist named Paul Mullins disagrees with both of the first two assessments.  He says that the doughnut was actually found in an English recipe book of American recipes in 1803.  Just after the Revolutionary war, the English wanted to mock the Americans in as many ways as possible.  They knew the American recipe for fried dough.  But they wanted to make us sound like idiots.  So they claimed that Americans took their fried dough and punched a hole out of the center of it.

But more recent discoveries have come to light.  In 2013 someone was rumaging through the a bunch of books from a garage sale when they found a recipe book from 1800 with something called a “dow nut.”  Evidently, the Baronness had been a recipe spy.  She raided the kitchen of recipes from a friend who had in turn had this circular fried bread recipe passed down to her for generations.  But she called her nut something entirely else.  The Barronness wanted hers to sound original and not like a copy so she made up the “dow nut” name.

As for how the Jelly ended up getting stuck in the doughnut in the first place, it remains an utter mystery.  Each region seems to have it’s own variety of the jelly filled doughnut.  Japan and China  even make theirs with a sweet bean paste.  And some people think that witches were the first people to put jelly in a doughnut.  They believed that witches from Berlin cursed their doughnuts with jelly to stop American motivation and keep them out of the war.  A 1942 article in an American Newspaper suggests that these new fangled jelly doughnuts were harmful to the war effort.


The Guide Salutes The Doughnut’s Creation

Whatever the reason for the doughnut, and whoever came up with putting jelly inside them we at the Guide salute the doughnuts magnificent creation.  Whether they be witches from Berlin or a petulant boy who didn’t like soft dough at the center of his fried bread, the doughnut is a magnificent creation.  And the jelly inside of that doughnut was pure genius.

Usually, at this point, I would share one of my favorite recipes for the holiday that we were celebrating.  Unfortunately, I do not have any personal experience with creating a recipe.  And I would be a bit scared of repeating a recipe for something I had not already made in the first place.  So I am not going to add that here.  I want you to trust me when I say something is good and I couldn’t honestly recommend something unless I had at least tried it out once.

My Favorite Donut Shop – The Donut Man In Glendora, CA

In lieu of giving out a recipe, however, I am going to share with you my all time favorite Donut Shop.  I know I have already alluded to it.  But if you live in the Southern California area and have not been to the Donut Man in Glendora, you are missing out on a treat.  I remember the first time I went to the Donut Man.  I had a friend who attended a nearby college and got the munchies at 2:00 AM. (No, it was not pot fueled munchies. I  know what you are thinking,)  He said he knew of a place that made fresh Donuts at that hour.  So we hopped in the car and headed to the donut shop.  When we got there there was a police car parked in the lot and we saw several people standing out there by the window to order.

When we walked up to the shop, I peered into the window.  There are the inside were people shaping and creating their donut masterpieces.  One person made twists with chocolate on the inside of them.  Another was doing a batch and stuffing huge fresh glazed strawberries on the inside of them.  My mouth instantly began to water.  And then I stared at the rack of donuts on the inside.  There was a gigantic assortment of donuts of all varieties before me.  I didn’t know what to choose.  Usually I would just grab a jelly of some sort, but here it seemed like I had endless possibilities.

Should I choose a lemon filled, a boston cream, a jelly filled, or an apple fritter that looked like the side of a football?  I stood there with a confused look on my face for a bit.  My friend insisted that I choose none of those.  He said I needed to try the strawberry glazed donuts with cream cheese filling on the inside.  So after threatening me with a good time, I eventually relented and purchased the donut.  One bite and I was in donut heaven.  Someone stuffed strawberry cheesecake and put it in a donut.  I devoured the magnifent and rediculously sized Donut in no time and I craved more.  But my mind told me it was not a good idea unless I was aiming at having a heart attack at the age of 21.

I have since been to the Donut Man many times.  And I have tried countless varieties of donuts.  And the crazy thing is, they are all amazing.  Even the simple ones with the colored candy coating taste like culinary delights.  Red candy coating tastes like Cherry Flavored.  Orange tastes like Orange.  Yellow tastes like lemon.  I could go on and on, but you get the picture.  And seasonally they add other culinary confections.  Pumpkin cheesecake donuts in October and November.  Peach Glazed ones in the summer. The Donut Man is always creating.  And those creations amaze me every single time.


Continue The Conversation

So what are some of your favorite dessert delicacies?  Do you have a particular favorite type of donut?  And what is your favorite type of jelly donut?  Also, what is your favorite donut shop?  I would love to hear from all of you about these things.  I love to try new places.  And who doesn’t like finding some amazing donut shop somewhere?

If you loved this post, please follow me here at the guide and check out some of my other food holiday posts.  Email subscribers will get access to The Dad Rules.  These are ten rules about parenting that every dad should follow, and every mother should know about.  Thank you for stopping by.

Until next time, “Mmmm, Donuts.”

David Elliott, Single Dad’s Guide to Life

 

Other Food Holidays

Cheese Day

Mint Julep Day

Cheese Souffle Day